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Kindergarten - Science - Weather - Overview

The March Science lessons are an introduction to weather. The emphasis in kindergarten will be on observation and description of daily weather changes. How people are affected by the weather and the identification of the four seasons and the local weather patterns during the different seasons will be the main focus.

Technical explanations of meteorological phenomena will be studied in grades two and four.

A place in the classroom should be reserved for recording the daily weather. A bulletin board set up for this purpose would be ideal. There are many different ways a bulletin board could be designed. Following are two suggestions:

1. In the center of the bulletin board, attach a square divided into three sections, each with a particular weather designation. Each day, select a student to place three arrows on the chart pointing to the appropriate sections to indicate that day's weather. You may also wish to include information about the day, date, and season.


2. Make a "weather window." Cover a bulletin board with white paper and divide the "window" into four parts with brown lines. Add construction paper curtains around the edges. Draw a large tree with branches outside the "window." Decorate the tree to reflect the current season. Provide weather symbols (a sun, raindrops, snowflakes, clouds). Every day have students take turns making the weather in the "weather window" match the weather outside. You may also wish to add people to the scene. Display the people involved in various seasonal activities. Children could add appropriate clothing to the people that would also reflect the daily weather.

 

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 27 - Weather

Objectives

Communicate how weather affects people.

Classify objects according to how they are used.

Observe and record weather data using symbols.

Materials

One of the books listed below

A bulletin board display upon which weather data may be recorded (see the Overview for suggestions)

A collection of seasonal objects such as mittens, sandals, boots, a raincoat, a beach ball, sunglasses, an umbrella, a scarf, a swimsuit, etc.

One piece of drawing paper for each student

Crayons

Suggested Titles

Keats, Ezra Jack. A Letter to Amy. New York: Harper & Row, 1968.

Weather plays a central role in this story. A young boy writes a letter to his friend. The weather affects what happens next. This is a wonderful read-aloud story and a nice way to introduce how weather affects people.

Rogers, Paul. What Will the Weather Be Like Today? New York: Greenwillow, 1990.

From various areas and habitats of the world, animals and humans discuss the possibilities of their day's weather and how weather affects people and cultures. This is also an excellent read-aloud choice for introducing the unit on weather.

Teacher Note: Students may not realize that weather is different in different parts of the country and of the world. They may even think that the weather in Baltimore is the weather everyone else in the world is experiencing. If you notice this misconception amongst your students, you may wish to bring in newspaper clippings to point out the differences in the weather across the United States.

Procedure

Engage the children in a discussion of ways in which the weather influences their lives. Ask specific questions that address common weather phenomena of the Baltimore area, such as: What do you do when it gets cold outside? Do you do different things in winter than in summer? What do you do during a thunderstorm (snowstorm, rainy afternoon)?

Say: Weather is what the air outside is like; it is always changing.

Ask: What kind of weather do you like best? (Allow several children to respond. Ask why they like that particular kind of weather.)

Following the discussion, read one of the titles listed above. Discuss how the weather in the book you read affected the people or animals of the story. Guide children to conclude that weather affects people.

Display the collection of seasonal items. Hold up each item in turn, and ask the children to identify it. Ask the children to help you categorize the items into different groups. Put all the items used on warm, sunny days in one group. Put all the items used on a cold day in another

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 27 - Weather

group. Put all the items used on rainy days in the last group. Discuss how the weather affects the items people use and the clothes they wear.

Draw the students' attention to the bulletin board you have set up. Explain the symbols you have chosen to represent the daily weather. Select a student to record today's weather on the bulletin board. Explain that just as the weather changes daily, the bulletin board must be changed daily. Tell the children that you will select another student to record the weather for tomorrow.

If you have access to the other title suggested above, read it at this time.

 

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Distribute drawing paper to the children. Instruct them to draw a picture of themselves dressed appropriately for warm and sunny weather and performing a warm-weather activity. On the other side of the paper, children should draw a picture of themselves dressed appropriately for cold weather and performing a cold-weather activity.

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 28 - Weather

Objectives

Observe and record weather data using symbols.

Classify months of the year according to their season.

Observe that seasons follow a cycle.

Materials

One of the books listed below

A wall calendar (preferably one that includes seasonal pictures)

One piece of large drawing paper (12 x 18) for each student

Crayons

Tape

Suggested Titles

Butler, Daphne. First Look at Changing Seasons. Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 1991.

This simple introduction to the changes that occur in nature during the four seasons is just right for reading aloud to young children.

Evans, David and Claudette Williams. Seasons & Weather. New York: Dorling Kindersley, 1993.

Part of the "Let's Explore Science" series, this book with large print and beautiful photographs helps young children become more aware of weather and seasonal phenomena. This is a wonderful book to share with the children.

Iverson, Diane. Discover the Seasons. Nevada City, CA: Dawn Publications, 1996.

This beautifully illustrated book explains the changes in nature through each season. A two-page craft and recipe section is included to accompany each season. This is a lovely read-aloud book.

Thomson, Ruth and Sally Hewitt. Spring. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1994.

After a short introduction about the reason for the season, this book offers an imaginative collection of craft and science projects, all designed to explore the springtime of the year. This book is colorful and informative and will appeal to kindergartners.

(See also: Summer, Autumn, and Winter all by the same authors, Childrens Press, 1994)

Procedure

Review the symbols you have chosen to represent the daily weather. Select a student to record today's weather on the bulletin board. Discuss any changes that may have occurred in the weather from yesterday. Be sure children are firm that weather is always changing.

Show the wall calendar. Ask: Does anyone know what this is called? Do you know what it is used for? (Allow children to share information they may already have about a calendar and its purpose.)

Say: This calendar shows all the days in one year. A year is divided into four parts, called the four seasons.

Ask: Do you know the names of the seasons?

Say: They are spring, summer, fall, and winter. Fall is also called autumn.



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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 28 - Weather

Ask: Do you know what the weather is like in spring? in summer? in fall? in winter? (Allow time for the children to discuss what they already know about the weather in each

season.)

Say: The weather of each season depends upon where you live. In many places, spring is warm and flowers bloom. In the middle of the year comes a hot summer that is followed by a cool fall, when the daylight part of the day gets shorter. At the end of the year comes a cold winter, and maybe snow. Some children live in places where it never snows. In some places, the leaves stay green all year; they never fall to the ground. Whatever the weather may be like, the year still goes through four seasons--spring, summer, fall, winter--over and over, every year.

Show the calendar again. Name the months that make up each of the four seasons. If the calendar has pictures depicting the seasonal changes, be sure to show them to the children. Point out holidays that occur in each of the seasons as well as typical seasonal activities. Have children identify their birthday month and the season of their birth. You may wish to tear off the pages of the calendar. Help the children classify the months according to seasons.

Read one of the books from the list above.

 

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Distribute the drawing paper. Assist the children in folding the paper into four parts to create vertical columns. Write spring on the chalkboard. Instruct the children to copy the word spring on their paper at the bottom of the first column. Tell them to draw a picture that represents spring above the word. Write summer on the chalkboard. Instruct the children to copy the word summer at the bottom of the next column. Instruct them to draw a picture that represents summer. Continue the activity for fall and winter. (You may wish to provide printed labels for the words spring, summer, fall, and winter. Instruct the children to paste the labels at the bottom of each column, rather than having them copy the word.) Following the drawing, assist the children in rolling their papers into a cylinder shape so the winter section touches the spring section. Tape the paper together in the cylinder shape. Guide children to conclude that seasons follow a cycle by asking questions such as: Which season follows summer? Which season follows winter? etc.

























spring

























summer

























fall

























winter







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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 29 - Weather

Objectives

Observe and record weather data using symbols.

Review the four seasons of the year.

Describe how weather changes with the seasons.

Materials

One of the titles listed below

A collection of seasonal objects such as: mittens, a woolen scarf, a snow shovel, a light weight jacket, a kite, plastic flowers, sunglasses, a beach ball, a jump rope, a sweatshirt, a football, etc.

 

Suggested Titles

Adoff, Arnold. In for Winter, Out for Spring. San Diego: Harcourt, 1990.

This is a collection of poems, told through the perspective of a young girl. It celebrates family life throughout the yearly cycle of the seasons. It is a nice read-aloud book.

Helldorfer, Mary Claire. Gather Up, Gather In: A Book of Seasons. New York: Viking, 1994.

Words and pictures evoke the changing seasons in this beautiful book. It is perfect for reading aloud.

Lionni, Leo. A Busy Year. New York: Knopf, 1992.

Willie and Winnie befriend a tree and watch it change during the four seasons.

Ryder, Joanne. Chipmunk's Song. New York: Dutton, 1987.

This is a lovely read-aloud book. It tells the experiences of a boy who shrinks so he can experience life as a chipmunk through the four seasons.

Procedure

Select a student to record today's weather on the bulletin board. Discuss any changes that may have occurred in the weather over the last few days.

Say: We know a year is divided into four parts. Do you remember what those four parts are called? (the seasons) Ask: Who can name the four seasons? Be sure children understand that the seasons follow a cycle. Spring is always followed by summer. Summer is always followed by fall, etc.

Ask: What season is it now? Does the weather change very much from winter to spring?

Discuss with the children how the weather changes with each season. Point out how the children's clothing changes with the seasons.

Read one of the books listed above or choose a title from Lesson 28. Draw attention to the changes in nature and also the changes in weather.

Display the seasonal objects you have collected. Hold up each item and ask the children to identify it (many of the objects may be the same ones used in Lesson 27). Divide the class into four groups. Assign a season to each group without telling the others. Each group will outfit one member to represent their season. Have the other groups guess which season is being portrayed.

Ask: Are there some activities you enjoy only at certain times of the year? What are they? Why can you do these activities only during certain times of the year? (Children should conclude that the weather influences their activities.)

Ask: Which of the seasons is your favorite? Why? (Allow time for children to respond.)

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 29 - Weather

 

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Discuss with the children the foods that people like to eat in the different seasons. Point out that hot soup, warm cereal, and hot chocolate are all foods associated with the winter season. Challenge the children to name foods associated with the other seasons.

Play an auditory game with the children called Sounds of the Seasons.

Directions:

1. Brainstorm with the children sounds common to each season.

2. List the sounds on the board under the headings Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter.

3. Draw a simple picture to represent each word.

4. As a group, decide how each sound should be represented. (You could use vocal sounds or simple instruments to imitate the sound of each item listed.)

5. Once all the sounds have been determined, point to the picture/words in random order.

6. Children will imitate the Sounds of the Seasons.

Examples:

Spring Summer Fall Winter

rain bees crunching leaves snow falling

birds ocean waves cheers at a football game ice skating

sniff a flower lawn mower trick-or-treating Santa's Ho-Ho-Ho

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 30 - Weather

Objectives

Observe and record weather data using symbols.

Infer that a thermometer can be used to measure air temperature.

Infer that the air temperature changes with the seasons.

Demonstrate how a thermometer works.

Materials

A collection of thermometers (meat, candy, air, fever, etc.)

Practice Thermometer paper (attached)

Heavy drawing paper or construction paper (one per student)

A red crayon or marker

Procedure

Select a student to record today's weather on the bulletin board. Discuss any changes that may have occurred in the weather.

Say: We have learned that the four seasons of the year have different weather.

Ask: What is the weather like in the spring? in the winter? etc. (Call on several children to describe the typical weather associated with each season.)

Show the collection of thermometers. Ask: Do you know what these instruments are called? Do you know what they are used for? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: These instruments are called thermometers. They are used to measure how hot or how cold something is. The word temperature means how hot or cold something is.

Show the fever thermometer. Ask: Have you ever had your temperature taken with a fever thermometer? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: Your body temperature was recorded on the thermometer. It showed how hot or how cold your body temperature was when you were sick.

Write the words hot and cold on the board. Read the words to the children. Ask: Can you name something that is hot? cold? (Record responses under the appropriate headings. Be sure children are firm on the concept of hot and cold. You may also wish to use the terms warm and cool.)

Show the other thermometers and identify what they measure. Point out how a thermometer works.

Say: Many thermometers have a colored liquid inside a tube. As the temperature goes higher, the liquid rises in the tube. As the temperature goes lower, the liquid goes down in the tube.

Show the air thermometer. Say: People use a thermometer to measure how hot or how cold the air is. When the sun comes up, it warms the air and the temperature goes up. When the sun goes down, the air gets cooler and the temperature goes down.

Say: The temperature changes with the seasons.

Ask: What is the temperature like in the summer? (It is hot.) What will the thermometer look like on a hot, summer day? (The red liquid will be high in the thermometer.)

Ask: What is the temperature like in the winter? (It is cold.) What will the thermometer look like on a cold, winter day? (The red liquid will be low in the thermometer.)

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 30 - Weather

Ask: Do you think it is important for people to know what the temperature is? Why? (Guide children to conclude that the air temperature influences the clothes we wear and the activities we do.)

Measure the current air temperature in your classroom. Record the finding and allow the children to study the thermometer to note where the liquid is located. Put the thermometer outside a window for a few moments. Read and record the outside air temperature. Allow children to examine the thermometer. Be sure they note the differences in the readings and the

location of the liquid in the thermometer.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Assist the children in making a practice thermometer (attached).

Directions

1. Duplicate the practice thermometer on heavy drawing paper or construction paper.

2. Tell the children to color the liquid strip red. Instruct them to carefully cut out the strip on the dotted lines.

3. The teacher will need to snip an opening at the bottom of each child's thermometer (see cut here).

4. Assist the children in threading the red liquid strip through the slit at the base of the thermometer.

5. Remind the children that as the air temperature increases, the liquid in the thermometer rises. When the air temperature cools, the liquid in the thermometer will lower.

6. Instruct the children to make their thermometers show a warm day reading by moving the red strip up or down in the thermometer.

7. Check for understanding.

8. Instruct the children to make their thermometers show a cold day reading by moving the red strip up or down.

9. Check for understanding.

















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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 30 -Weather

BCP DRAFT SCI 62

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 31 - Weather

Objectives

Define clouds.

Infer that clouds affect the weather.

Observe and record weather data using symbols.

Materials

One of the books listed below

A piece of blue construction paper (8 x 11) one per student

A large bag of cotton balls

Glue

Suggested Titles

Carle, Eric. Little Cloud. New York: Philomel, 1996.

A little cloud becomes all sorts of things before joining other clouds as rain. This is an excellent book to share with children when first introducing clouds.

de Paola, Tomie. The Cloud Book. New York: Holiday House, 1975.

This book is all about the different types of clouds and the weather that follows them. The book also describes what people of different cultures think about clouds. This is a wonderful book to share with children.

Merk, Ann & Jim. Clouds. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke Books, 1994.

Simple text and photographs introduce children to the formation of clouds. This book is excellent for reading aloud.

Shaw, Charles. It Looked Like Spilt Milk. New York: Harper & Row, 1947.

This is a wonderful book. It describes how clouds look like various things.

Spier, Peter. Dreams. Garden City: Doubleday, 1986.

Two children watch cloud formations in this beautifully illustrated wordless picture book.

Procedure

Select a student to record today's weather on the bulletin board. Discuss any changes that may have occurred in the weather.

Write the word clouds on the chalkboard and pronounce it. Ask the students to share what they know about clouds.

Weather permitting, take the children outside to look at clouds. Discuss the different shapes the clouds seem to form. Have the children tell what the shapes look like to them.

Read one or two of the books listed above. Discuss any similarities noted in the clouds observed outside and those depicted in the book.

Say: Clouds float in the air. They are made up of very tiny drops of water or tiny bits of ice. Clouds come in all different shapes, sizes, and colors.

Ask: Have you ever seen the sky covered with a blanket of gray clouds so thick that you can't see the sun? Do you know what the weather will be like when the sky looks like that? (A thick blanket of gray clouds sometimes means that rain is coming.)





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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 31 - Weather

Say: On a clear day, the sun shines in a bright blue sky and there are no clouds. Ask: Have you ever seen the sky on a clear day? Do you know what the weather will be like when the sky looks like that? (There will be no rain or snow.)

Assist children in concluding that clouds play a role in the weather and can be used to determine what the weather will be like.

Read another one of the books listed above.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Distribute the blue construction paper and a handful of cotton balls to each student. Instruct the children to create a cloud picture with the cotton balls. Encourage the children to gently pull the cotton balls apart to create a "cloud-like" effect. As the children work, review that clouds are made up of tiny drops of water or tiny bits of ice.

BCP DRAFT SCI 64

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 32 - Weather

Objectives

Infer that wind is moving air.

Explain how clouds form rain.

Discuss the saying It's raining cats and dogs.

Observe and record weather data using symbols.

Materials

A paper grocery bag or paper lunch bag (one per student)

Scissors

Crayons or markers

Stapler or tape or glue

Streamers (made from crepe paper cut into strips)

Yarn or string

Suggested Titles

Bauer, Caroline F., editor. Rainy Day: Stories & Poems. New York: Lippincott, 1986.

This book, by a variety of authors, is a collection of stories and poems about rain. It is suitable for reading aloud.

Ets, Marie Hall. Gilberto and the Wind. New York: Puffin, 1963.

This is the story of a little boy and his playmate the wind. The wind provides the boy with fun and frustration.

Hutchins, Pat. The Wind Blew. New York: Scholastic, 1974.

This is a nice read-aloud about the wind.

Martin, Bill, Jr. & John Archambault. Listen to the Rain. New York: Holt, 1988.

This is a wonderful book. The rhyming, rhythmic text captures the beauty of the sounds and silences of rain.

Merk, Ann & Jim. Rain, Snow, & Ice. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke Books, 1994.

Simple text and photographs introduce children to the formation of rain, snow, and ice. This book is excellent for reading aloud.

Serfozo, Mary. Rain Talk. New York: Macmillan, 1990.

This is a wonderful read-aloud book about a little girl who enjoys a day in the rain. She observes the sounds the rain makes as it falls onto things around her.

Shulevitz, Uri. Rain, Rain, Rivers. New York: Farrar, Strauss, & Giroux, 1969.

Suitable for reading aloud, this book is about a child indoors who watches the rain on the windows and in the streets.

Spier, Peter. Rain. Garden City: Doubleday, 1982.

This picture book is about two children who experience the fun and wonders of a rainstorm.

Sturges, Philemon. Rainsong/Snowsong/ Poems by Philemon Sturges. New York: North-South Books, 1995.

Illustrations and rhyming text describe the joys of playing in the rain and snow.





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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 32 - Weather

Procedure

Select a student to record today's weather on the bulletin board. Discuss any changes that may have occurred in the weather.

Ask: Who remembers what clouds are? (Clouds are tiny drops of water or tiny bits of ice that float in the air.)

Say: Today we are going to learn how clouds make rain.

Say: Let's think about times when it has rained. Can you name some things that happen before it rains? (Guide children to recall how the sky gets darker; it might get windy or colder; there may be distant thunder, etc.)

Say: We know that clouds change in color, size, and shape. Dark, thick clouds usually signal rain. Remember clouds are made up of tiny drops of water. Many tiny drops make large drops. The large drops are too heavy to float in the air. So, the drops fall from the clouds. They fall to the earth as rain.

Ask: What do you think happens to the rain that falls on the earth? (Allow children to speculate.)

Say: Rain soaks into the earth. It fills up the lakes and streams and helps the plants grow.

Rain can fall in fine droplets called a mist or drizzle. It can come down in a light shower, or it can pour down hard.

Say: There is a funny expression people sometimes use to describe a really heavy rain. They say, "It's raining cats and dogs!"

Ask: Have you ever heard that saying before? Why is it a funny expression? (Allow children to discuss how cats and dogs don't fall from the sky.)

Say: The next time we have a really heavy rain remember this saying. You can say, "Look how hard it's raining. It's raining cats and dogs!"

Say: If it rains too much for a long time, then that can cause a flood.

Say: What are the things we would need to wear if we went out in a rain shower? (Allow children to discuss.)

Ask: Have you ever seen a rainbow? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: Rainbows appear when sunlight shines through raindrops in the sky.

Say: Sometimes it gets windy right before a rain shower.

Ask: Do you know what wind is? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: Wind is moving air. You can't see the wind, but you can see the way the wind moves the branches of trees, or blows your hat off. Sometimes the wind blows gently and feels good. Sometimes the wind blows hard and brings stormy weather.

Discuss how wind can vary in intensity. Ask: Can you name some things you might see if there are light, gentle winds? (people flying kites, leaves moving, some people may have hair blowing in their faces, paper blows down the street, etc.)

Ask: Can you name some things that you might see if there are very strong winds? (garbage cans rolling down the street, tree branches or small trees blow over, damage to roofs and small structures, etc.)

Say: Did you know that wind is helpful? Can you think of ways that it might be? (Allow children to respond.)



BCP DRAFT SCI 66

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 32 - Weather

Say: People use the wind to sail boats and to help dry clothes. Wind can spread plants by blowing seeds to new places. Wind helps animals by carrying smells to help them find food or to warn them that their enemies are near.

Conclude the lesson on wind and rain by reading several of the books suggested above.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Assist the children in creating a wind sock.

Directions

1. Distribute one paper grocery bag to each student.

2. Direct children to cut the bottom out of their grocery bag.

3. Allow the children to color the bag with markers or crayons.

4. As the children are coloring, circulate around the room and staple the streamers to one end of each student's grocery bag.

5. Staple string or yarn to the other end of the grocery bag to make handles.

6. Take the children outside to test their wind socks. Point out that the streamers indicate the wind direction and the wind speed. Discuss how the streamers will look on a very windy day and how they will look on a calm day.

BCP DRAFT SCI 67

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 33 - Weather

Objectives

Describe how people keep safe in some kinds of weather.

Observe and record weather data using symbols.

Materials

A piece of dark blue construction paper (8 x 11) one per student

Scraps of black, white, and yellow construction paper in a variety of sizes

Black crayons or markers

Silver glitter

Glue

Suggested Titles

Branley, Franklyn M. Flash, Crash, Rumble, and Roll. New York: HarperCollins, 1985.

This book combines science, observation, and commonsense advice about thunderstorms. This is a good read-aloud choice.

Merk, Ann & Jim. Storms. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke Books, 1994.

Simple text and photographs introduce children to the weather phenomenon of storms. This is an excellent nonfiction book to share with the children.

Parker, Mary. City Storm. New York: Scholastic, 1990.

This read-aloud book tells the story of a summer day in the city and how it is interrupted by a thunderstorm.

Polacco, Patricia. Thunder Cake. New York: Philomel, 1990.

This beautiful book addresses the fear of thunderstorms. It is a wonderful book to share with youngsters. You may wish to bake a Thunder Cake with your class. The recipe is printed on the last page of the book.

Procedure

Select a student to record today's weather on the bulletin board. Discuss any changes that may have occurred in the weather.

Say: We have learned that weather is always changing. (Draw attention to any changes in the local weather over the last several days.)

Ask: Have you ever been outside playing on a sunny day, and then suddenly the wind turns cool and the sky darkens and you know a storm is on the way? (Allow children to discuss scenarios where they have witnessed changing weather.)

Say: Today we are going to talk about thunderstorms. Can you name the sounds of a thunderstorm? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: We can see lightning in the sky. It looks like bright streaks of light. We can hear thunder. The thunder sounds scary, but it cannot hurt us. The lightning, however, can strike trees, buildings, and people. We must be careful when lightning is nearby.

Say: You don't have to be scared of lightning if you know what to do.

Ask: Do you know what the safety rules of lightning are? (Allow children to share any information they may have about storm safety.)

 

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 33 - Weather

Ask: Do you know what you should do if you are outside and you hear thunder and see lightning? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: You should go inside quickly. You should never stand under a tree.

Ask: Do you know what you should do if you are in a swimming pool, lake or at the beach and a thunderstorm approaches? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: You should quickly get out of the water and find an inside place to wait for the storm to pass.

Conclude the lesson by reading at least one of the titles listed above.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Assist the children in creating a nighttime storm in the city picture.

Directions

1. Distribute one piece of dark blue construction paper to each student.

2. Provide scraps of black construction paper.

3. Instruct the children to cut square or rectangular shapes from the black construction paper.

4. Direct the children to glue the black rectangular shapes to the very bottom of the blue construction paper to create a city skyscraper scene.

5. The teacher will paper-punch yellow dots from a scrap of yellow construction paper. Distribute a handful of yellow dots to each child. Direct the children to glue the dots on the black building shapes to create the lights that shine from the building windows.

6. Provide scraps of white construction paper.

7. Instruct the children to cut cloud shapes from the white paper. Children should color the bottoms of the clouds with a black crayon to create storm clouds.

8. Tell the children to glue the storm clouds across the top of the paper.

9. Make a bolt of lightning across the top of the paper by creating a zigzag glue line. Gently sprinkle silver glitter on the glue line. Tap off any excess glitter.

10. Allow the papers to dry before displaying.

 

BCP DRAFT SCI 69

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 34 - Weather

Objectives

Compare and contrast the way people respond to a rainstorm and a snowstorm.

Define the term blizzard.

Observe and record weather data using symbols.

Materials

One of the titles listed below

Suggested Titles

Bauer, Caroline F., editor. Snowy Day: Stories & Poems. New York: Lippincott, 1986.

This book, by a variety of authors, is a collection of stories and poems about snow. It is suitable for reading aloud.

Chapman, Cheryl. Snow on Snow on Snow. New York: Dial, 1994.

The author uses repetitive word play to tell the story of an African American boy who loses and then rescues his dog while sledding in the snow. This is a wonderful read-aloud book.

Keats, Ezra Jack. The Snowy Day. New York: Viking, 1962.

This is a wonderful book to share with children. A little boy experiences the snow in the city.

London, Jonathan. Froggy Gets Dressed. New York: Scholastic, 1992.

This is a delightful book. Page by page, Froggy returns for more layers of clothing until he is too tired even to go out.

McCully, Emily Arnold. First Snow. New York: Harper & Row, 1985.

In this wordless picture book, a timid mouse discovers the thrill of sledding in the first snow of winter. This is a lovely book to share with children.

Neitzel, Shirley. The Jacket I Wear in the Snow. New York: Greenwillow, 1989.

This is an enjoyable read-aloud book told with a rebus format. It tells the story of a little girl and the winter clothes she must wear to play in the snow.

Procedure

Select a student to record today's weather on the bulletin board. Discuss any changes that have occurred in the weather over the last several days. This is the last weather lesson; however, you may wish to continue recording the weather.

Ask: Who remembers what happens to the temperature in warm weather? (The temperature rises, or goes higher, in warm weather.)

Ask: What happens to the temperature in cold weather? (The temperature drops, or lowers, in cold weather.)

Say: We know that when clouds become very full of water drops it will rain. In winter, if the temperature drops low enough, then instead of rain we get snow.

Ask: What are some of the things we need in snowy weather? (warm clothing, snow shovels, extra blankets, etc.)

Say: When just a little snow falls, we call it a snow flurry.

Ask: Do you know what a big snowstorm that dumps lots of snow is called?

Say: A blizzard is a snowstorm that dumps lots of snow.

BCP DRAFT SCI 70

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 34 - Weather

Ask: Have you ever played in the snow? (Allow children to discuss experiences with snow.)

Ask: When you were playing in the snow, did you get a close look at a snowflake? What did it look like? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: When snowflakes fall, they may appear to look the same. But every snowflake is different! Each snowflake is its own beautiful design of tiny ice crystals. Even though every snowflake is different, they all have six sides.

Ask: Can you name some ways that rainstorms and snowstorms are different? (Allow children to respond. Guide children to think about the differences in temperature, clothing, and activities.)

Ask: Can you name one activity that you could do after a snowfall that you couldn't do after a rainfall? (Allow children to respond.)

Conclude the lesson by reading at least one of the books listed above.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

You may wish to involve the children in a cooking activity. Following is a recipe for Snowball Surprise Cookies.

Ingredients 1 cup chopped pecans 2 tablespoons sugar

1 cup flour 1 teaspoon vanilla

cup softened butter powdered sugar

 

Mix the chopped pecans and flour in a bowl and set aside. Put softened butter into another bowl. Add sugar and vanilla blend well until creamy. Pour flour and pecans into butter mixture and blend. Pinch off dough and roll with hands into 1" snowballs. Place on baking sheet and bake in a 300-degree oven for about 40 minutes, or until brown. While snowballs are still warm, roll in powdered sugar. Makes about 35 snowballs.

BCP DRAFT SCI 71

Kindergarten - Science - Weather

Bibliography

Suggested Read Aloud Titles

*Adoff, Arnold. In for Winter, Out for Spring. San Diego: Harcourt, 1990.

*Bauer, Caroline F., editor. Rainy Day: Stories & Poems. New York: Lippincott, 1986.

*________. Snowy Day: Stories & Poems. New York: Lippincott, 1986.

*Branley, Franklyn M. Flash, Crash, Rumble, and Roll. New York: HarperCollins, 1985.

*Butler, Daphne. First Look at Changing Seasons. Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 1991.

*Carle, Eric. Little Cloud. New York: Philomel, 1996.

*Chapman, Cheryl. Snow on Snow on Snow. New York: Dial, 1994.

*de Paola, Tomie. The Cloud Book. New York: Holiday House, 1975.

*Ets, Marie Hall. Gilberto and the Wind. New York: Puffin, 1963.

*Evans, David and Williams, Claudette. Seasons & Weather. New York: Dorling Kindersley, 1993.

*Helldorfer, Mary Claire. Gather Up, Gather In: A Book of Seasons. New York: Viking, 1994.

*Hutchins, Pat. The Wind Blew. New York: Scholastic, 1974.

*Iverson, Diane. Discovering Seasons. Nevada City, CA: Dawn Publications, 1996.

*Keats, Ezra Jack. A Letter to Amy. New York: Haper & Row, 1968.

*________. The Snowy Day. New York: Viking, 1962.

*Lionni, Leo. A Busy Year. New York: Knopf, 1992.

*London, Jonathan. Froggy Gets Dressed. New York: Scholastic, 1992.

*Martin, Bill, Jr. & John Archanbault. Listen to the Rain. New York: Holt, 1988.

*McCully, Emily Arnold. First Snow. New York: Harper & Row, 1985.

*Neitzel, Shirley. The Jacket I Wear in the Snow. New York: Greenwillow, 1989.

*Merk, Ann & Jim. Clouds. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke Books, 1994.

*________. Rain, Snow, & Ice. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke Books, 1994.

*________. Storms. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke Books, 1994.

*Parker, Mary. City Storm. New York: Scholastic, 1990.

*Polacco, Patricia. Thunder Cake. New York: Philomel, 1990.

*Rogers, Paul. What Will the Weather Be Like Today? New York: Greenwillow, 1990.

*Ryder, Joanne. Chipmunk's Song. New York: Dutton, 1987.

*Serfozo, Mary. Rain Talk. New York: Macmillan, 1990.

*Shaw, Charles. It Looked Like Spilt Milk. New York: Harper & Row, 1947.

*Shulevitz, Uri. Rain, Rain, Rivers. New York: Farrar, Strauss, & Giroux, 1969.

*Spier, Peter. Dreams. Garden City: Doubleday, 1986.

*________. Rain. Garden City: Doubleday, 1982.

*Sturges, Philemon. Rainsong/Snowsong/Poems by Philemon Sturges. New York: North-South Books, 1995.

*Thomson, Ruth and Hewitt, Sally. Spring. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1994.



*indicates annotation in a lesson