Third Grade - American History - Lesson 14 - The Thirteen Colonies

 Objectives

Identify the reasons the colonists settled in the New World.

Differentiate economic and human rights problems.

Write a story about settling in the New World.

 Materials

Classroom-size world map

 Suggested Books

Student Title

Rich, Louise Dickinson. The First Book of The Early Settlers. New York: Franklin Watts, 1959.

This chapter book is written in an accessible way for third graders and contains information on Jamestown, Plymouth, and New Amsterdam.
 
 

Teacher Reference

Kalman, Bobbie. Tools and Gadgets. New York: Crabtree, 1993.

Reische, Diana. Founding the American Colonies. New York: Franklin Watts, 1989.
 
 

Procedure

When the first people came to America they settled in areas that later became states. Ask: Remembering that the states had not been formed yet, what name was given to the areas of land in which the first people lived? (colonies) Define colony for the students as "a region that is ruled by a faraway government." Explain that in the case of most of the American colonies, the government that ruled from afar was that of England. Have a student locate England on the classroom world map and then trace across the Atlantic Ocean to the eastern seaboard of the United States to show the distance between the two places. Ask: What are some of the reasons that a country such as England would want to establish a colony in a far away place? (acquire new land, take advantage of the natural resources of the colony) Ask: By the same token, why do you think people would want to leave their country and go to live in an unfamiliar, far away place? (make a new start, opportunities to make a better living, etc.)

Tell the students that there were many reasons why people wanted to move to the colonies. Write the following terms on the board: economic and human rights. Explain that problems encountered by people throughout history usually fall into two areas: an economic problem, which is "a difficulty getting and keeping things that people need or want," and problems caused when a person's basic rights are denied. Explain that a right is "the freedom to do a certain activity" for example freedom of speech or the freedom to practice the religion of your choice. Write the definitions on the board. Ask the children to give you examples of economic problems and human rights problems. Write their contributions on the board.

Explain that the colonists viewed coming to the new world as a way to make a new start and each group had their own reasons for leaving Europe. The differences between the groups were the reasons they went to the New World, for example looking for religious freedom or hoping to get rich, and how each group's colony was set up in the New World. Explain the following reasons to the students and ask the students to identify each as an economic or human rights problem:

They could not find work in Europe.
They did not have the opportunity to practice their chosen religion.
They could not afford to own land in Europe.
Explain that moving to the New World provided solutions to each problem:
There was work for every trade in the New World.
In the New World the colonists were able to practice whatever religion they chose.
Land was offered for free or at a very low cost to the colonists.

Display the following story starters. Have the students choose one to write a short story. Briefly discuss the information students should include in each. For example, discuss basic needs; the trials of moving to a new land; tools typical of the time period.

 Once the students have finished their stories have them proofread for the following things:

1. Does each sentence begin with a capital letter and end with a period?

2. Did you indent the first line of the paragraph?

3. Did you begin all the other lines of the paragraph at the margin?

4. Does each sentence tell what a person or thing did?
 
 

Third Grade - American History - Lesson 15 - The Thirteen Colonies
 
 

Objectives

Identify that people's needs are met by using goods and services.

Become familiar with the concept of bartering.

Complete Colonial Jobs worksheet.
 
 

Materials

1 per student

Colonial Jobs worksheet (included)
 
 

Suggested Books

Student Titles

Nicely done photoessays that detail a day in the lives of a Pilgrim boy and a Pilgrim girl.

Waters, Kate. Samuel Eaton's Day: A Day in the Life of a Pilgrim Boy. New York: Scholastic, 1993.

Waters, Kate. Sarah Morton's Day: A Day in the Life of a Pilgrim Girl. New York: Scholastic, 1989.
 
 

Teacher Resource

Copeland, Peter F. Early American Trades Coloring Book. New York: Dover, 1980.

Kalman, Bobbie. Colonial Life: Historic Communities. New York: Crabtree, 1992.

Strohl, Mary and Susan Schneck. Colonial America: Cooperative Learning Activities. New York: Scholastic, 1991.
 
 

Procedure

Ask: What were some of the reasons that early settlers had for going to live in the New World? Explain that although the reasons for leaving were not all the same, once in the new country the groups faced many of the same problems. Ask: What problems can you imagine they encountered as they tried to settle in a new land? (find food, establish relations with the Native Americans, provide shelter)

It was very important for the settlers to bring supplies with them from England for the trip over and to have while they were getting settled in the New World. Have the students recall from Lesson 14 what they think the colonists would have needed to bring over with them and why (tools, weapons, food, clothing). Record their answers on the board.

Explain that once the colonists arrived in the New World there were still needs that had to be met. List the following needs on the board: shelter, food, clothes, transportation, education, health services. Ask the students to list products or goods that colonists would have to have in order to meet these needs (e.g. nails; tools for farming, building, sewing. Explain that products are "goods that people want and need." Write the word product with its definition as a heading above the list compiled of things the colonists would have needed (axe, hammer, lumber for shelter; sewing needle, fabric, thread for clothing; horses for transportation; cattle for milk and food; etc.)

Tell the students that in addition to products, the early settlers also needed services provided to meet their needs. Services are "helpful activities provided by one person or business to another" Give examples of services that the colonists would have needed such as teachers, doctors, blacksmiths, butchers, etc. Write the word services and its definition in another and the word needs in between to show students that needs are met with both goods and services (see diagram below).
 
 

Services º Needs » Products Helpful activities provided Goods that people want and need by others
 
 

Have the students list other services they can think of that the colonists would have needed. Record the student's responses on the board under the services column.

Direct the students' attention back to the list of needs on the board. Ask: How would a colonial family meet their need for products and services? Explain that colonists depended on each other to meet each others' needs. For example, a family might grow some of its own food and make some of its own clothing, but other needs would have to be met by trading goods and services with other people. Describe the following scenario to the students:

Betsy's father, Caleb Smith, is a doctor and he needs to buy an axe to cut trees down for lumber to build a barn. Mr. Miller has an ax he is willing to trade and his son, Caleb has been sick and needs the care of a doctor. Mr. Miller trades his axe for Dr. Smith's services.

Explain that this exchange of goods and services is called bartering. Write the word on the board.

Give each student a copy of the Colonial Jobs worksheet. Read each of the jobs and descriptions as the students follow along. Have the students follow the directions to complete the worksheet. Suggest clues and demonstrate using the process of elimination to complete the sheet. For extra credit, have the students think about the goods and services they use in their own lives. Have them list three products and three services they used in the past week on the back of the worksheet.

 Answer key

1. k
2. g
3. A
4. H
5. J
6. I
7. E
8. L
9. C
10. F
11. B
12. d
 
 

Third Grade - American History - Lesson 15 - The Thirteen Colonies

 Name ____________________________________________________________

 Directions: Write the letter of the description of the job next to the job name.

Colonial Jobs
 

1. Baker _____

2. Butcher _____

3. Mason _____

4. Roper _____

5. Saddler ______

6. Tailor ______

7. Blacksmith ______

8. Gunsmith ______

9. Weaver ______

10. Cooper ______

11. Miller ______

12. Hatter ______

 

a. Stone cutter

b. Ground wheat to make flour

c. Fabric maker

d. Made hats

e. Made iron tools and utensils

f. Made and repaired buckets, tubs and barrles

g. Prepared and sold meat

h. Rope maker

i. Maker of fine clothing

j. Saddle maker

k. Bread maker

l. Maker of rifles and guns


 
 

Bibliography


 


 Student Title

Rich, Louise Dickinson. The First Book of The Early Settlers. New York: Franklin Watts, 1959. (531-00518-6)

Waters, Kate. Samuel Eaton's Day: A Day in the Life of a Pilgrim Boy. New York: Scholastic, 1993. (0-590-46312-8)

Waters, Kate. Sarah Morton's Day: A Day in the Life of a Pilgrim Girl. New York: Scholastic, 1989. (0-590-44871-4)

Teacher Reference

Kalman, Bobbie. Colonial Life: Historic Communities. New York: Crabtree, 1992. (0-86505-511-4)

________. Tools and Gadgets. New York: Crabtree, 1993. (0-86505-488-6)

Reische, Diana. Founding the American Colonies. New York: Franklin Watts, 1989. (0-531-10686-1)
 
 

Teacher Resource

Copeland, Peter F. Early American Trades Coloring Book. New York: Dover, 1980.(0-486-23846-6)

Strohl, Mary and Susan Schneck. Colonial America: Cooperative Learning Activities. New York: Scholastic, 1991. (0-590-49133-4)