Third Grade - Geography - Lesson 6 - Geography of the English Settlements

Objectives
Locate the important colonial cities of Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Charleston.
Recognize that proximity to water influenced the development of cities.
List the colonies by region.

Materials
Classroom-size world map
Classroom-size U. S. map
Thirteen Colonies map for transparency (attached)
1 per student
Thirteen Colonies map (attached)

Suggested Books
Teacher Resource
Strohl, Mary and Susan Schneck. Colonial America: Cooperative Learning Activities. New York: Scholastic, 1991. (0-590-49133-4)

Procedure
Tell the students that they are now going to look at the locations of the colonies in the New World. Explain to the students that the colonies can be divided by the region of the Atlantic coast in which they are located. Display the transparency of the map showing the thirteen colonies. Point to the following terms at the bottom of the transparency: New England, Middle Atlantic, and Southern. Tell the students that the New England colonies were made up of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. Encircle the group of colonies that made up New England using a green marker to trace the borders of the colonies that should be included. Make a green mark in the box next to the words, New England. Do the same using different color markers for the Middle Atlantic colonies: New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania; and the Southern colonies: Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia.
Direct the students' attention to the classroom world map. Ask: What form of transportation did the first settlers use to travel to the New World? (ship, boat) Taking into consideration how the first settlers traveled and where they were coming from, why did the early settlers form colonies along the eastern shore of what is now the United States? (The east coast was directly across the Atlantic from western Europe.) Demonstrate by tracing the route from western Europe across the Atlantic to the eastern shore of the United States.
Tell the student that the Atlantic coast also had many bays which made it easy for ships to come close to shore. Define a bay as "an inlet of the ocean partly surrounded by land."
Explain to the students that two important bays to the colonists were the Chesapeake Bay and the Massachusetts Bay. Direct the students' attention to the classroom U. S. map. Show them where the two bays are located. Point out the way the land partly surrounds the water to form the bay.
Explain that colonial towns were built close to the water because access to a port was very important. Ask: Why were ports important to the development of a colonial town? (Major towns and cities had to have access to ships bringing people and goods to and from Europe.)
Give a map of the Thirteen Colonies to each of the students. Ask the students to locate the following cities on their maps: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Boston, Massachusetts; Baltimore, Maryland; Charleston, South Carolina. Ask: Looking at your map, what do you notice about the locations of three of the cities? (They are located near the Atlantic Ocean.) Ask a student to name the three cities that are located on the water (Charleston, Baltimore, and Boston) Tell the students that these cities were important in the development of trade because of their closeness to the ocean.
Display the overhead transparency of the Thirteen Colonies map for the students to refer to. Give each student a question sheet. Read over the directions with the students. Direct their attention to the first line under the name of each region. Tell the students to write the name of the color they use to shade in the colonies of each region. Have them complete the worksheet by writing the names of the colonies that were located in each region in part A and list the port cities and towns found in the colony that is referred to in part B.

Answer Key
Part A
 
 
 

New England
 

Middle Atlantic
 

Southern
 

New Hampshire
 

New Jersey
 

Maryland
 

Massachusetts
 

New York
 

Virginia
 

Rhode Island
 

Delaware
 

North Carolina
 

Connecticut
 

Pennsylvania
 

South Carolina
 

 
 

Georgia

Part B
1. Plymouth, Boston
2. Baltimore
3. Jamestown, Williamsburg
4. Charleston

Third Grade - Geography - Lesson 6 - Geography of the English Settlements

Name ___________________________________________________________

Part A
Directions: Using a different color for each region, shade in the colonies that are part of each region and write the name of the color used on the first line under the name of each region. Next, list the colonies by region. Using your map as a reference, write the name of each colony on the lines below the name of the region of which it is a part.
 
 

New England

Middle Atlantic

Southern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Part B
Directions: Use the map of the colonies to locate the correct seaport city and/or town to answer the following questions.

1. What two seaports are shown on the map in the colony of Massachusetts?

_____________________________________, _________________________________________

2. What seaport is shown on the map in the colony of Maryland?

____________________________________________

3. What two seaports are shown on the map in the colony of Virginia?

______________________________________, _________________________________________

4. What seaport is shown on the map in the colony of South Carolina?

____________________________________________
 

Third Grade - Geography - Lesson 7 - Farming in the Thirteen Colonies

Objectives
Locate each of the regions of the Atlantic coast on a map.
Identify the crops raised in each of the colonies.

Materials
1 per student
Thirteen Colonies map (included)

Suggested Books
Student Title
Behrens, June and Pauline Brower. Colonial Farm. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1976. (0-516-08718-5)
An informative photo essay that tells an interesting account of life on a colonial farm.

Teacher Reference
Hakim, Joy. Making Thirteen Colonies: A History of US. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993. (0-669-36833-4)
Strohl, Mary and Susan Schneck. Colonial America: Cooperative Learning Activities. New York: Scholastic, 1991. (0-590-49133-4)

Procedure
Ask the students to recall that in the last lesson they learned the location of the Thirteen Colonies within three regions of the Atlantic coast. Ask: What are the names of the three regions? (New England, Middle Atlantic, and Southern) Ask the students to think about what they know regarding the climate in places in the northern part of the United States versus the climate in places in the southern part of the United States. Ask: How would the climate in New England be different from the climate in the southern colonies? (It would be colder in New England than it would be in the southern colonies.)
Explain to the students that the climate throughout the year was generally colder in New England than it was in the Middle Atlantic and Southern colonies, making it a harder place to farm because there was less time during the year that was good for farming. The Middle Atlantic and Southern colonies had a longer time for farming, which meant the colonies in those regions had a longer growing season for crops.
Tell the students that in addition to not having the perfect climate for farming, New England did not have the kind of land that was good for farming. Instead of having smooth soil, the land in New England was very rocky. Explain that although colonists in the North did grow vegetables and grains, such as wheat, it was not on a large scale; they grew just enough to feed their families. Instead, New England's biggest industries were fishing and shipbuilding. Looking at a U. S. map, show the students that the extensive New England coastline gave fisherman access to very good fishing waters and the forests that existed provided the lumber to build ships.
Explain that the Southern colonies had a warm climate that was perfect for farming, so large farms called plantations became the main industry in the Southern colonies. Tell the students that the main crops that were raised were large crops of corn, tobacco, rice, and indigo. Explain that indigo was a plant that produced a blue dye used to make ink.
Tell the students that the Middle Atlantic colonies had the best of both worlds. They had a warm enough climate for farming and access to coastal seaports for fishing. The main crops that were grown in the Middle Atlantic colonies were corn and grains.
If possible read Colonial Farm by June Behrens and Pauline Brower aloud to the class. It gives an overview of life on a colonial farm and is accompanied by nice color photographs.
Give each student a map of the Thirteen Colonies and a question sheet. Have the students use the map and map key to gather information regarding the products produced in each of the colonies.

Answer key
1. grain
2. fish
3. grain
4. fish
5. fish, tobacco
6. grain, tobacco
7. North Carolina
8. Massachusetts
9. New Hampshire
10. Georgia
11. Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut
12. Rhode Island

Third Grade - Geography - Lesson 7 - Farming in the Thirteen Colonies

Name __________________________________________________

Directions: Referring to the map and map key, list the main product or products that came from the following colonies.

1. New York ___________________________

2. New Jersey __________________________

3. Pennsylvania _________________________

4. Delaware ____________________________

5. Maryland ___________________________, ___________________________

6. Virginia ____________________________, ____________________________

Directions: Refer to the map and map key to identify the colony or colonies.

7. Which colony grew indigo, rice, grain, and tobacco ______________________

8. Which colony is made up of two separate areas?

______________________________________

9. Which colony does not produce any of the products shown in the map key?

___________________________________

10. Which colony is furthest south? _____________________________________

11. Which colonies were part of the shipbuilding industry?

__________________________________, ______________________________,

__________________________________

12. Which is the smallest colony?_______________________________________