BCP DRAFT GEOG 1



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

First Grade - Geography/Science - Overview

The geography and science objectives for September are integrated because they all relate to identifying, and locating places on the earth's surface. There is quite a bit of memorization here for students including the continents, the oceans, hemispheres and poles. Songs, chants and games have been provided to assist the students in remembering this information. Practice these facts as often as possible throughout the month when you have short periods of time to fill, or when making transitions. The same geography objectives continue through October, but the Science objectives will change. Save the students' maps and handwriting papers. They will become part of "My Geography Book" the students will put together at the end of the unit in October.

These lessons have been designed with simplicity and availability in mind. Required materials should be readily accessible to all teachers; for most of the lessons you will need a class-sized world map and/or a globe. All the lessons can be enhanced by the use of some additional resources, particularly appropriate literature. Suggested book lists have been provided at the end of the unit. The availability of each of these books has been verified with Enoch Pratt and/or Baltimore County libraries. Whenever possible use books, pictures, audio tapes, trips, and guest speakers to spark student interest.

Teacher Resources

Buckley, Susan, and Elspeth Leacock. Hands-On Geography. New York: Scholastic, 1993.

Reproducibles and activities for early geography skills.

Evans, Joy, and Jo Ellen Moore. Beginning Map Skills. Monterey: Evan-Moor, 1996.

Evans, Joy, and Jo Ellen Moore. Beginning Maps and Globes. Monterey: Evan-Moor, 1995.

Blackline reproducibles for use in the classroom.

Knowlton, Jack. Geography From A to Z - A Picture Glossary. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1988.

Great introduction to geographic terms. Gives concise definitions with illustrations.

Knowlton, Jack. Maps and Globes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1985.

History of mapmaking, good how-to book.

McCarthy, Tara. Literature-Based Geography Activities. New York: Scholastic, 1992.

Activities that connect literature to geography activities, many easily adaptable to other books.

 

BCP DRAFT GEOG 2

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 1

(adapted from Reading Mastery III, Lesson 31, SRA, Macmillan/McGraw Hill School Publishing, 1995)

Objectives

Identify basic facts about the world.

Distinguish between land and water on a map or globe.

Materials

Chart listing the five important facts about the world:

A. You live on the world.

B. The world is a giant round ball.

C. The world is called Earth.

D. Most of the world is covered with water.

E. Parts of the world are land.

Globe

World map for each child (master included)

Charted sentences for students to copy

Blue and green crayon for each child

Handwriting paper

Procedure

Say: You will be learning a lot about the world this year. It is important that you know some facts about the world first. Here are the facts about the world.

You live on the world. Everybody listen to that fact again. You live on the world. Say that fact. Signal. Repeat until firm.

Your house is on the world. If we went in a car as far as we could go, we would still be on the world. Remember: You live on the world.

The world is a giant round ball. Everybody listen to that fact again. The world is a giant round ball. Say that fact. Signal. Repeat until firm.

The world is called Earth. Everybody listen to that fact again. The world is called Earth. Everybody, what's another name for the world? Signal. (Earth)

Most of the world is covered with water. Everybody, listen to that fact again. Most of the world is covered with water. Say that fact. Signal. Repeat until firm. If you just keep traveling in a straight line, you would come to water sooner or later. Remember: Most of the world is covered with water.

Parts of the world are land. Everybody, listen to that fact again. Parts of the world are land. Say that fact. Signal. Repeat until firm. Call on a student. Which part do

we live on? (land)

Everybody, is most of the world covered with land or water? Signal. (water)

BCP DRAFT GEOG 3

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 1

Show the children a globe. Say:

This is a globe. A globe is a round ball with a map on it. Everybody, listen to that fact again. A globe is a round ball with a map on it. Say that fact. Signal. Repeat until firm.

A globe is the same shape as the world. Class, a globe is the same shape as_____________? Signal. (the world)

Spin the globe around slowly so that the children can see it. Say:

All the areas colored blue on the globe are water. What are the areas colored blue on the globe? Signal. (water). All of the rest of the areas on the globe are land.

Spin the globe. Touch either land or water. Say:

Is this land or water? Signal. Repeat several times, eventually calling on individual students.

Activity

Distribute maps to children. Have children color all the water areas on their maps blue. Have them color all the land areas green. Save the students' work. It will become part of "My Geography Book" the students will put together at the end of the unit in October.

Say:

Touch a part that is land. Everybody do it now. Check.

Touch a part that is water. Everybody do it now. Check.

What color is water on a map or globe? (blue)

Display the following charted sentences. Have the children complete on handwriting paper. (Save for unit book.)

Most of the world is covered with water.

Parts of the world are land.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 4

First Grade - Geography/ Science - Lesson 2

Objectives

Identify, name, and locate 4 of the 7 continents.

Identify Asia as the largest continent.

Identify Australia as the smallest continent.

Identify North America as the continent where we live.

Identify South America as the neighboring continent to North America.

Vocabulary

Make a sentence strip for each word to post as they are introduced.

seven

continents

Asia

Australia

North America

South America

island

Materials

Classroom size world map

Student world maps

Charted sentences for students to copy

Handwriting paper

Crayons or colored pencils

Procedure

Remind students that you have already talked about maps and globes. Review the definition of each from Lesson 1. Firm up if necessary. Ask if anyone remembers the two different types of areas on the map (land and water). Have several students point out different areas of water on the map. Then ask several students to point out areas of land on the map.

Tell the students that the large areas of land on the map are called continents. There are seven continents. Point them out on the map. Name the continents as you point to them. Have the children repeat the names with you. Have them say the names of the continents as they point to them on their own maps. Tell the children the largest continent in the world is called Asia. Point it out on the map. Point out to them that it shares a land mass with another continent, Europe. Help the children find Asia on their own maps.

Tell the children the smallest continent in the world is Australia. It is an island. Define: not attached to any other land mass, water on all sides. Have children find Australia on their own maps. Next locate North America. Tell children this is where we live. There are two other countries that are part of the continent of North America besides the United States: Canada and Mexico. Help the children locate South America on their own maps. Tell the children that South America is our neighboring continent.

Have the children echo recite the following chant several times.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 5

First Grade - Geography/ Science - Lesson 2

 

The Continents

The continents are seven big pieces of land,

They are covered by grasses, trees, mountains and sand,

They make up our earth with the oceans of blue,

They are homes for animals and people, too.

Have children color the continents as follows:

Color Asia purple.

Color brown polka dots on Australia.

Color North America red.

Color South America green.

Display the charted sentences. Underline the words Asia, Australia, North America, and South America. Tell the children that these words are capitalized because they are the names of the continents. They capitalize the names of the continents just as they capitalize their own names. Have the children copy the sentences on handwriting paper. Remind the children to use capital letters at the beginning of each sentence.

 

There are 7 continents. Asia is the largest. Australia is the smallest.

We live in North America. Our neighbor is South America.

Save the map for the next geography lesson. Save the handwriting paper for students' geography books.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 6

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 3

Objectives

Locate, identify and name Europe, Africa, Antarctica.

List all 7 continents.

Vocabulary

Make a sentence strip for each word to post as it is introduced:

Europe

Africa

Antarctica

Review vocabulary from previous lessons.

Materials

Classroom size world map

Student continent maps from previous lesson

Charted sentences for students to copy

Handwriting paper

Crayons or colored pencils

Procedure

Review and locate on the world map the continents introduced in the last lesson. Ask if anyone can give you some facts about the continents. (A continent is a large mass of land. There are seven continents. Asia is the largest continent. Australia is the smallest continent. The continent we live on is called North America. Our neighboring continent is called South America.) Ask questions to prompt if necessary. Have children echo recite the continents poem from previous lesson. See if they can say it on their own.

Tell the children there are three other continents that you will talk about today. Point out Europe on the map. Europe is attached to Asia with only mountains dividing them. Europe and Asia are the only two continents that are attached in this way. Have the children use their own maps to verify.

While you demonstrate using the world map, have the children place one finger on Europe. Have them move straight down across the Mediterranean Sea to Africa. Identify Africa as the next continent you'll study. Tell the children it is a very large continent. Only Asia is larger. Part of it is covered with a desert (define if necessary) that is the largest in the world.

Tell the children that the last continent is very different. It is located at the bottom of the world. Demonstrate on the globe to make this point. It is different because it is always cold there and the land is covered with ice. It is so cold there that only scientists try to stay there and only for short periods of time. Even animals do not live on the land of Antarctica; only penguins live around the shore along with some sea life. The summer there is only as warm as our winter.

Teach the children the Continental Clap (x over a word indicates a clap).







BCP DRAFT GEOG 7

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 3

The Continental Clap

The continents are seven lands.

We can say them while we clap our hands.

x x
A - sia
x x x
Af - ri - ca
x x x x
North A - mer - i - ca
x x x x
South A - mer - i - ca
x x x
Ant - arc - ti - ca
x x
Eu - rope
x x x
and Aus - tral - ia




Have students color the last three continents on their individual continent maps from the previous lesson.

Color Europe yellow.

Color Africa orange.

Leave Antarctica white.

Display the charted sentences and have the children copy them on handwriting paper. Remind the children to use capital letters at the beginning of each sentence and for the first letters of the names of the continents. Save maps and handwriting papers for the geography book students will be putting together later.

Europe is attached to Asia. Africa has the largest desert in the world. Antarctica is very cold and covered with ice.

Teacher Resource

Markle, Sandra. Pioneering Frozen Worlds. New York: Atheneum, 1996.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 8

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 4

Objectives

Locate continents on a world map or globe.

Identify and locate the equator.

Identify and locate the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

Identify and locate the North and South Poles.

Vocabulary

Make a sentence strip for each word to post as introduced:

equator

Northern Hemisphere

Southern Hemisphere

Materials

Globe

Classroom size world map

Individual world maps (clean copy)

3 different color crayons per child (no blue)

Charted sentences for students to copy

Handwriting paper

Procedure

Show the children a globe. Point out the equator, moving your finger completely around the globe. Tell the children that the equator is an imaginary line around the earth halfway between the North and South Poles. Half of the earth is above the equator and half is below. This imaginary line also shows the division of the earth's climate. Have the children trace and label the equator. The seasons above the equator are the opposite of the seasons below the equator. For example when it is winter north of the equator (point to the area you are talking about), it is summer south of the equator. Choose some random countries to point out and ask the children what season it would be there if it were a given season somewhere else. For example, point out Canada. Ask the children what season it is in Canada if it is winter in South America. Point out South America. Do this with several combinations until you are sure the students get the idea.

Let the students know that the temperature near the equator is very warm. Places that are located near the equator are warm all year long, no matter what season it is. Point out some countries that are near the equator. Tell them that the farther north or south you get from the equator the colder it is. Point out the North and South Poles. Show that they are the farthest you can get from the equator and are always very cold. Have the children label the areas where the North and South Poles would be on their maps. Tell the children that the half of the earth between the North Pole and the equator is called the Northern Hemisphere and the part between the South Pole and the equator is called the Southern Hemisphere. Tell them that hemi means half; hemisphere is half of a sphere or the globe. Use the globe to demonstrate. Use the class size world map to show the children the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Have the students circle (in two different colors) and label the hemispheres on their own maps. Practice identifying BCP DRAFT GEOG 9

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 4

which hemispheres the continents are located in by pointing out the continents and having the children tell you the hemisphere. Make sure the children note that a continent may be in two hemispheres (Asia, Africa, South America). Have the children label the continents on their maps and color them using one color for continents in the Northern Hemisphere, another for those in the Southern Hemisphere and still another for continents that are located in both. Display and read the charted sentences and have students copy the sentences. (Save map and handwriting for geography book.)

The equator divides the earth in half. The two parts are the

Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere.

Suggested Books

Kandoian, Ellen. Molly's Seasons. New York: Cobblehill Books, 1992.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 10

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 5

Objectives

Define east, west, north, and south as directions.

Identify east, west, north, and south on a map.

Materials

A globe

Classroom size world map

Procedure

Ask the children to name words about direction. List appropriate responses on the board (possibilities include around, over, under, up, down, north, south). Circle, or add, up and down to the list. Discuss and list examples of up and down, making sure to emphasize that these two directions are relative to the surface of the earth (up is away from the surface and down is toward the surface). Point out that up and down are opposite directions; they are away from each other. Tell students that two more important directions are north and south. Circle, or add, north and south on the board.

Ask: Does anyone know where the North Pole is? Hold up a globe, point to and identify the North Pole for the class to see. Explain that the North Pole is the spot on the earth that is farthest north. Anytime anyone is moving toward the North Pole, they are moving in the direction called north. Point to the word north on the board.

Point to and identify the South Pole on the globe. Explain that the South Pole is the spot on the earth that is farthest south. Ask: Does anyone know what direction you would be going if you were moving toward the South Pole? Point to the word south on the board.

Tell the class that there are two other main directions on the earth: east and west. Write

the words east and west on the board. Draw two perpendicular lines on the blackboard and mark N (north) and South at the top and bottom of the vertical line (1). Add a line to show east (2). Tell the children that if you are facing north, east is to your right. Next add a line to show west (3). Tell the children that if you are facing north, west is to your left. Point out that east and west are opposite one another. Next, demonstrate east and west on a globe or map, making sure to first point out north and south. Ask: What direction is opposite east? What direction is opposite west? Move your finger in one of the four directions and have the children identify the direction. Next move your finger in another direction and have the children identify. Repeat until firm.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 11

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 5

Label the classroom with the four main directions. (Make sure the children understand that these directions do not just exist in the classroom, but extend outside and continue on.) Have paper labels for the walls and removable masking tape for the floor. (Using the tape on the floor helps demonstrate that these directions are on the surface of the earth.) Hang the north label on the north wall or place tape on the floor to make a direction diagram and label the north arrow. Ask: If this direction is north, which way is south? Ask: If this direction is north and you are facing it, what direction is to your right? What direction is opposite east? (Add the labels as the correct answers are given.) To help the children become familiar with directions, have them stand and do the following: everyone face north, now face east, face west, face north, face south, fast west, face east. You may also use the directions to identify items in the classroom. Ask: What is on the north wall? On what wall is the door? On what wall are the windows?

If time permits you may want to play a variation of Simon Says with the class. Ask the children to point (walk, hop) in a certain direction prefacing the commands either with or without Simon Says. Students who follow directions incorrectly or who move when you have not said Simon Says sit down and watch the remainder of the game.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 12

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 6

Objectives

Review the cardinal directions.

Review the names and locations of the continents.

Identify the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans.

Discuss characteristics of ocean water.

Compose a riddle describing the locations of the oceans.

Materials

A classroom size world map

Procedure

Review the cardinal directions. On the board draw a directional diagram with just the north arrow labeled. Ask students to name each direction. Have students come up and add the labels to complete the diagram. Ask: What do we know about each direction? (north is toward the North Pole, south is toward the South Pole, east and west are opposite each other, etc.)

Next, review the names and locations of the continents on a classroom size world map. In order to make sure that the class knows what the ocean is, tell the children that the ocean is the entire body of salt water that covers nearly three-fourths of the earth. Show the children how much more of the earth is covered with water than land by drawing a rectangle on the board and dividing it into four equal parts. Shade in three-fourths of the rectangle. Tell the children that this shows how much more water there is than land on the earth.

Three divisions of the ocean are the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. The continents are large islands with a single, continuous body of water around them. Ask: Has anyone taken a trip to the beach? Can someone tell me some ways that the water in the ocean is different from the water that we drink? The water in the ocean tastes very salty. Ocean water contains large amounts of salt that come from rocks in the earth that the water has broken down and dissolved.

While looking at a world map, discuss the origins of the names of the oceans. The Indian Ocean, which is the third largest ocean, gets its name from the country that it borders. Tell the children that they are now going to find the third largest ocean on the map. Here is the first clue: This ocean is north of Antarctica. Call on a child to come up and point to Antarctica on the map. The next clue is that Africa is on the left side of it. Have a child point to Africa. The next clue is that Australia is on the right side of the part of the ocean we are looking for. Have a child point to Australia. The last clue is that the continent of Asia is above the ocean. Ask: Do you see a triangle that points out of Asia? That country is India and it points to the ocean and gives the ocean its name, the Indian Ocean.

The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean. There are two possible origins for the name of the "S" shaped Atlantic Ocean. The first is that the Atlantic Ocean was named after the legendary lost continent of Atlantis which supposedly sank in those waters thousands of years ago. The second possible source is that the ocean was named by the Ancient Romans and Greeks for the waters that lay beyond the Atlas mountains. The Atlas Mountains are located across Northwest Africa starting at the Atlantic Ocean and ending at the Mediterranean Sea. Have a child find Africa on the map and point to the ocean that borders the west side of Africa.



BCP DRAFT GEOG 13

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 6

The word pacific means peaceful. The Pacific Ocean, the largest ocean, was named by the Portuguese explorer, Ferdinand Magellan. After passing through the Strait of Magellan, which he discovered, and entering the sea on the other side, Magellan said, "May we always find [the waters] as peaceful as this morning. In this hope, I shall name this Sea of the Pacific." (Fritz, Around the World in a Hundred Years: From Henry the Navigator to Magellan. Scholastic, 1994.) Trace Magellan's path across the Atlantic Ocean, through the Strait of Magellan at the tip of South America, and into the Pacific Ocean, making sure to emphasize the continent that he left from (Europe) and the continent where the Strait of Magellan is located (South America).

Have the children now come up with their own ways of describing where the oceans are located, as was done with the Indian Ocean. This could be done by writing a description using directional words or by composing a riddle. For example:

"I am to the east of North America and to the West of Europe. Which ocean am I?"

Suggested Books

Cole, Joanna. The Magic School Bus: On the Ocean Floor. New York: Scholastic, 1992.

 

 

BCP DRAFT GEOG 14

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 7

Objective

Match animals to the continents that are associated with them.

Materials

Classroom size world map

Animal worksheet

Continent worksheets

Chart of animals and matching continents

Scissors, glue, crayons or colored pencils

Procedure

Discuss with the class the animals that you would find if you were to visit each of the continents. You might want to discuss with the class the reasons the animals are indigenous to that continent (for example, the climate in the case of the penguin and the habitat in the case of the koala bear, which eats only the leaves from the Australian gum tree).

Display a chart listing the animals and the continents on which the animals would be found. Also, attach to the chart color pictures of the animals (from magazines, etc. or you could enlarge the animals from the attached worksheets and color them yourself) and identify the animals for the children, so that when they are coloring their worksheets they will be able to recognize the animals, if they are not already familiar with them.

Asia - panda (lives in China)

Europe - reindeer (northern Europe)

Africa - giraffe, lion, zebra

Australia - kangaroo, koala bear

North America - buffalo

South America - llama

Antarctica - penguin

Have the children color and cut out the animals on the attached worksheet. They will then place the animals on the continent where the animal can be found. Choose one of the books listed below or one with which you are familiar to read aloud to the children.

Review the animals and the continents on which they live by playing I Spy. Pretend you are walking across an unidentified continent and give the children clues as to where you are so they can name the continent.

I spy a kangaroo.

I spy a koala eating the leaves from a gum tree.

I see water all around this continent.

Where am I?

Possible Field Trips

The Baltimore Zoo

A Llama Trek sponsored by the Lady Maryland Foundation Living Classrooms - At the Emory

BCP DRAFT GEOG 15

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 7

Knoll Farm in Harford County.

Pet Farm Park in Vienna, Virginia - here the children can see buffalo.

The following is a list of read aloud books that are about the animals from this lesson:

Benson, Patrick. Little Penguin. New York: Philomel, 1991.

Brett, Jan. The Wild Christmas Reindeer. New York: Scholastic, 1990.

Cherry, Lynne. The Great Kapok Tree. San Diego: HBJ, 1990.

Cowcher, Helen. Antarctica. New York: FSG, 1990.

Dorros, Arthur. Rain Forest Secrets. New York: Scholastic, 1990.

Fox, Mem. Koala Lou. New York: Scholastic, 1987.

Fox, Mem. Possum Magic. San Diego: HBJ, 1983.

Glimmerveen, Ulco. Tale of Antarctica. New York: Scholastic, 1989.

Guarino, Deborah. Is Your Mama a Llama? New York: Scholastic, 1989.

Hadithi, Mwenye. Greedy Zebra. Boston: Little, Brown, 1984.

Joosse, Barbara M. Mama, Do You Love Me? New York: Scholastic, 1991.

Lane, Margaret. The Giraffe. New York: Random House, 1985.

Lane, Margaret. The Lion. New York: Random House, 1985.

Lester, Helen. Tacky the Penguin. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1988.

McMillan, Bruce. Summer Ice. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1995.

Palacios, Argentina. The Llama's Secret: A Peruvian Legend. New York: Troll Associates, 1993.

Packard, Mary. A Visit To Australia. New York: Western, 1992.

Roffey, Maureen. I Spy at the Zoo. New York: Four Winds Press, 1988.

Ryden, Hope. Wild Animals of America ABC. New York: Dutton, 1988.

Wood, Audrey. Little Penguin's Tale. San Diego: HBJ, 1989.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 16

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 8

Objective

Locate and name Canada, the United States, Mexico, and Central America.

Use a key or legend.

Materials

Classroom size world map

North America worksheet

Crayons or colored pencils

Procedure

Point to North America on a world map. Have the children identify the continent as North America. Write it on the board. Explain that North America is divided into several countries. Compare North America to another location that can be divided into smaller parts. As an example it may help to explain that North America is a little bit like your school; it is one place but it contains many parts. A school can be broken down to its classrooms; continents are broken down into countries or areas. Tell students that the three largest countries in North America are Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Write these names on the board. Another part of the continent of North America is Central America. Central America is not a country, but an area located south of Mexico. Pass out the North America worksheet. Ask: What country do we live in? (Circle United States on the board.) Point to the United States on the world map and help the children point to the United States on their own maps.

Tell the children to look at their maps and follow these directions:

Color the box next to the name of our country green.

Color the box next to the word Mexico red.

Color the box next to the word Canada orange.

Color the box next to the words Central America yellow.

Color the box next to the word Water blue.

These boxes and names make up a map key. The map key shows us information about the map and this map key shows what the colors stand for or mean. Tell the children they are now going to follow the map key to color their maps. Have the children first trace the outline of each country or area with the appropriate color. (Circulate around the classroom to make sure they are following your directions and tracing the appropriate country or area with the appropriate color.) For the United States, make sure that the students also color Alaska and Hawaii green. When the children finish coloring, review again the countries and areas. Save the students' work; it will become part of "My Geography Book," which the students will put together at the end of the unit in October.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 17

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 9

Objectives

Review the locations and names of Canada, the United States, Mexico, and Central America.

Review the locations and names of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

Locate and name the continent, country, state, and community in which the students live.

Use a key or legend.

Materials

Classroom size world map, globe

Classroom map of the United States

United States worksheet

Crayons or colored pencils

Procedure

Have the children name the country in which we live. Write United States of America on the board. Ask: What country is south of the United States? What country is north of the United States? What area is south of Mexico? What ocean is west of the United States? What ocean is east of the United States?

Explain that just as continents are broken down into countries, countries are broken down into smaller parts, and in the United States these smaller parts are called states. Underline the word states in the words United States. Hand out the United States worksheet to the class. Point out to the children that the map shows all the states in the country. Use the world wall map or a globe to show the actual locations of Alaska and Hawaii.

Ask: Does anyone know the name of the state in which we live? Help the children to locate the state of Maryland on their map worksheets. Next have the children find the map key. Tell them to point to the first box in the map key. Have them write Maryland on the line next to it. Have them color the box with an orange crayon. Tell the children to point to the next box. Have the children write the word water on the line. Have them color the box next to the word with a blue crayon. Tell the children they will use this map key as a guide to color their maps later in the lesson. Review with the children the name of their country and their state. Ask: Which is larger, our country or our state?

Tell the children to put an "N" in the state north of Maryland. Have them color the state to the west of Maryland with the yellow crayon. Ask: What ocean is east of Maryland? Have the children label the Atlantic Ocean. Now have the children use the map key to color their maps. Save the students' work; it will become part of "My Geography Book," which the students will put together at the end of the unit in October.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 18

First Grade - Geography/Science - Lesson 10

Objectives

Review the names of the 7 continents.

Locate the continent of a story setting.

Complete a world map puzzle.

Materials

Map puzzle (two puzzle masters supplied, choose one)

Construction paper

Blue and green crayons for each child

Procedure

Review the Continental Clap with the children. They should be able to recite it independently by now. Read a literature selection about another country to the children. There is an extensive list of suggested literature at the end of this unit but you may prefer to use one of your own choosing. Ask: How is life shown in this story different from or similar to yours? Locate the story setting on the map for the students. Ask: On which continent does the story take place? In which hemisphere is this continent located? Have students locate the equator. Based on the equator's proximity to the country, have the children tell you if they think the climate is warm, cold, or mixed. If the story has only one setting (some of the suggested literature has multiple settings in the same story), choose several random locations to give the children as much practice as possible. Whether the story has multiple settings or not, be sure to include Maryland and identify it as where the students live. Have the students go through the process of identifying continent, hemisphere and climate.

Give each child a world map puzzle and a piece of construction paper. Have the children cut out the puzzle pieces. Help the children get started by having them follow along as you put the puzzle together by posting pieces on the board or on an overhead projector. Tell them to first assemble, then paste the puzzle pieces in place on construction paper. Have the children color the continents green and the oceans blue.